kathleen blanchard, EmaxHealth: elder HIVers experience premature brain aging (0126)

HIV infection or treatments causing premature brain aging
by Kathleen Blanchard RN
Jan 23rd, 2010
The Journal of Infectious Diseases 2010;201:336–340

Individuals with HIV are  found to suffer from premature aging of the brain, either from the infection or from the treatments. Scientists say the findings of concerning, given the present statistics that 14 to 18 percent of HIV infections in the US are among the over 50 age group. Cognitive decline and memory loss are being reported by individuals with HIV. Researchers say brain aging associated with HIV is a public health concern that needs more study.

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richard havlik & donna kaminski, the body pro: HIV/AIDS & aging overview (0120)

Aging Before Your Time?
By Richard J. Havlik, M.D., M.P.H. and Donna M. Kaminski
Fall 2009

chers—

this is a dramatic cultural redefinition of “AIDS.” there will also be unintended effects from this new characterization, and other embedded stigmas. thanks for the heads-up to jules levin & nelson vergel

namaste

—rk

Introduction

We are all aging, whether we are HIV positive or negative. It is part of the natural course of life. A small number of individuals live to 100 years of age with minimal disease and disability. Others seem to have accelerated aging with deterioration of multiple body systems, disability, and chronic diseases. Naturally, this brings us to wonder what factors account for this difference in aging.

To date, we’ve been able to identify a couple of factors. Resveratrol, a compound found to help fruit flies and yeast live longer, has been studied for its role in slowing down the aging process. Other studies have also looked at a gene called FOXO3A. People who have mutations in this gene seem to have a slower aging process. Studies are under way to see if these factors could be modified to help slow down the aging process, and to see what else seems to affect aging.

An Aging Epidemic

Fortunately for people with HIV, treatment has improved and people are living longer. It’s estimated that by the year 2015, almost half of people with HIV will be over 50. In New York City, over 36% are over 50. By 2005, the number of people with AIDS in the U.S. who were over 50 was seven times higher than it was in 1990. Some of this may be due to greater testing efforts, but some of it is also due to improved access to HIV treatment.

But older adults are still getting diagnosed later in their disease than younger people. An Italian study looked at 1,977 people who received care from 1986 to 1998. About a third had a late diagnosis of AIDS, and the most significant factor linked with that late diagnosis was age. People who were over 45 were more likely to be diagnosed at a later stage of HIV disease.

One study found that only 59% of HIV-positive adults over 65 survived more than three years, compared with 90% of adults aged 20 to 39.

Another study found that more than half of newly diagnosed older adults developed AIDS in less than a year. A third study found that only 59% of HIV-positive adults over 65 survived more than three years, compared with 90% of adults aged 20 to 39. Despite earlier testing efforts and greater access to medications, people are getting diagnosed at later ages and are at risk of shorter survival times.

In order to support people over 50, we need to have a better understanding of aging and HIV. This article will review what is known about the aging process and what is seen in people with HIV. Finally, it will review what needs to be better defined, and what might slow aging regardless of HIV status.

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nielsenwire: social networkers are mostly urban & affluent (0117)

The More Affluent and More Urban are More Likely to use Social Networks
September 25, 2009

If you’re in the U.S. and are using a social network like Facebook, MySpace or LinkedIn, chances are you’re more affluent and more urban than the average American according to Nielsen Claritas, which provides in-depth segmentation analysis of consumer behavior.

“Nielsen’s online data shows that about half of the U.S. population visited a social networking website in the last year and that number grows every quarter,” said Wils Corrigan, AVP, Research & Development, Nielsen Claritas. “The rising popularity of these sites and the deep engagement consumers have with them has advertisers and marketers asking for more and more detail as to which lifestyles should be targeted for their online advertising and promotions.”

Facebook vs Myspace

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nielsenwire: 17.5million seniors online in 2009, 10% of all internet users, 55% growth in segment (0116)

Six Million More Seniors Using the Web than Five Years Ago
December 10, 2009

While people 65 and older still make up less than 10 percent of the active Internet universe, their numbers are on the rise. In the last five years, the number of seniors actively using the Internet has increased by more than 55 percent, from 11.3 million active users in November 2004 to 17.5 million in November 2009. Among people 65+, the growth of women in the last five years has outpaced the growth of men by 6 percentage points.

Not only are more people 65 and older heading online, but they are also spending more time on the Web. Time spent on the Internet by seniors increased 11 percent in the last five years, from approximately 52 hours per month in November 2004 to just over 58 hours in 2009.

“The over 65 crowd represents about 13% of the total population and with this increase in online usage, they are beginning to catch up with their offline numbers,” notes Chuck Schilling, research director, agency & media, Nielsen’s online division. “Looking at what they’re doing online, it makes sense they’re engaged in many of the same activities that dominate other age segments – e-mail, sharing photos, social networking, checking out the latest news and weather – and it’s worth noting that a good percentage of them are spending time with age-appropriate pursuits such as leisure travel, personal health care and financial concerns.”

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charles emlet, J HIV/AIDS & soc serv (informaworld): HIV/AIDS service orgs 5X more effective in reaching HIVers over 50 than elder service orgs (0113)

Knowledge and Use of AIDS and Aging Services by Older, HIV-Infected Adults
Author:
Charles A. Emlet
Affiliation: Social Work and a Hartford Scholar in Geriatric Social Work at the University of Washington, Tacoma, USA
Appearing in: Journal of HIV/AIDS & Social Services, Volume 3, Issue 1 June 2004 , pages 9 – 24
Also incorporating: Journal of HIV/AIDS Prevention in Children & Youth

ABSTRACT

Older adults living with HIV/AIDS require a complex array of services. Such needs can be addressed both by the service network developed for HIV as well as the network developed for older persons. This study of adults, age 50 and over with HIV/AIDS (N = 41), compared the knowledge and use of services commonly available from the HIV network as well as the aging network. The study sample had similar knowledge of HIV services and services designed for older adults. These individuals, however, used a significantly higher number of services provided through the HIV network (mean of 2.61 services) compared to the aging network (mean of .68 services). Predictors for service use varied across systems. While the primary predictor of HIV service use was awareness, Medicaid eligibility and living arrangements were predictive of use of services from the aging network.

social workers “help starts here” site: link resources for HIV/AIDS & aging (0112)

HIV/AIDS Current Trends – The Aging of HIV
Reviewed by NASW Center of Workforce Studies Staff


HIV/AIDS and Older Adults
What Are the Transmission Risks for Older Adults?
Sexual Activity
Injection Drug Use
What Are Barriers to Intervention?
Stigma
How Social Workers Can Help
Facilitating Discussions About HIV/AIDs
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jules levin, NATAP: testosterone & frailty in older men (0111)

chers—

wikipedia on the “five components of frailty” mentioned below: “Frailty is determined based on cutoffs in 5 components – Muscle weakness, weight loss, low physical activity, exhaustion, and slow walking speed.”

namaste

—rk

These observations suggest that there may be an association between frailty and low sex hormone levels in older men. The only cross-sectional report that 
www.natap.org/2009/HIV/100709_01.htm

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