LA city councilmember bill rosendahl calls HIV/AIDS elder advocacy summit & new media training feb 12 (0131)

February 4, 2010
Contact: Nate Kaplan-(213) 473-7011, Richard Kearns-(310) 488-1328

ROSENDAHL CALLS LOS ANGELES HIV/AIDS ELDER ADVOCACY SUMMIT & NEW MEDIA TRAINING
Forum Open to the Public

Los Angeles – Los Angeles City Councilmember Bill Rosendahl is co-costing an “HIV/AIDS Advocacy Summit and New Media Training Conference” with the City’s AIDS Coordinator’s Office, and a coalition of Los Angeles grassroots advocacy organizations led by activist Richard Kearns.

The conference will be held on the 27th Floor of City Hall in the Tom Bradley Tower on Friday, February 12 from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. The program will offer instruction on:

  • building a website from scratch
  • practicing posting videos & text
  • meeting with city councilmembers and their staff
  • empowering adult activists and their allies with new media and networking skills

“This is a great opportunity for people living with HIV and AIDS to learn how to use the Internet to communicate with each other and the world,” said Rosendahl.  “This day-long training session will educate and empower individuals to use Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and other online sources to network and express themself through the powerful medium of the Internet.”

Kearns, a 58 year-old gay man living with AIDS in Los Angeles for more than 20 years, is a member of the growing group of long-term survivors.  He is a community-based Internet advocate, an AIDS activist, and publisher of two blogs. His has become a familiar face at LA City Council meetings, where he speaks regularly on issues that affect people living with HIV in Los Angeles, such as aging, the assisted healthcare system, and medical cannabis.

“Everyone treats us as liabilities when in fact, we are resources – both to ourselves and to our community,” said Kearns. “However, as a group, I’d also characterize elder people living with HIV and AIDS as ‘internet reluctant,’ and ‘technology resistant.’ The question becomes this: Why should we let ourselves be intimidated by something a nine-year-old can master in a single sitting?”

Anyone interested in attending the free conference should contact Richard Kearns at rk@aids-write.org or call 310-488-1328.

www.councilmanrosendahl.com
City Hall (213) 473-7011 West LA (310) 575-8461 Westchester (310) 568-8772



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miguel gomez et al, AIDS.gov: peer-generated new media in the fight against AIDS — a call to action (0130)

New Year’s Messages from AIDS.gov and Colleagues


chers—

this is an excellent 5-minute introduction to advocates using the new media for HIV/AIDS prevention, testing, treatment & survival education.

namaste

—rk

New Year’s Messages from AIDS.gov and colleagues highlighting voices and new media lessons learned.

alicia williams et al, AARP: volunteers over 50 now serve more hours more often (0129)

Connecting and Giving: A Report on How Mid-life and Older Americans Spend Their Time, Make Connections and Build Communities
By: Alicia Williams, John Fries, Jean Koppen and Robert Prisuta; AARP Knowledge Management
January 2010

prnewswire report here

Americans 45+ adding informal service to their work with established organizations; African Americans extremely active and engaged in communities and volunteering

WASHINGTON, Jan. 18 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Though volunteering through organizations has remained stable in the last several years, a new report from AARP finds that informal service work among baby boomers and others 45+ is on the rise.

According to the report, the number of boomers and older Americans engaged in self-directed volunteering—volunteering on their own, outside of a formal organization—increased from 34 percent in 2003 to 57 percent in 2009. Additionally, seven in 10 boomers reported they are engaged in volunteering either on their own or through an organization, which is a 20 percent increase over the number of people who say they volunteer through an organization alone.

“We have long known that baby boomers stand ready to serve, but this data gives us new information about how they are serving,” said Thomas C. Nelson, AARP Chief Operating Officer. “As AARP works to activate Boomers and older Americans, we continue to track these trends so that collectively, the service community can better meet the needs of everyone interested in giving back.” . . .

. . . Additional study highlights include:

  • The frequency of charitable giving among 45+ adults has increased over last year from 55 percent in 2008 to 72 percent in 2009. Volunteers were more likely than non-volunteers to donate to charitable or religious organizations.  Among those with higher incomes, donating was a fairly common practice—reported by more than 8 in 10 survey respondents.
  • The nature of civic engagement is changing, becoming more personal and more secular. Boomers and older Americans are less likely to join organizations. Although membership in religious organizations remains a relatively popular activity, involvement in these organizations has declined.
  • Volunteers have many motivations for giving their time in service, but their chief motivation is feeling a personal responsibility to help others when they need it. This reason was reported by 68 percent of volunteers overall; and rated as very important by half of all volunteers. Other top motivations cited included giving back to others, making their own lives more satisfying, and helping their own neighborhood or community.
  • While the rate of traditional volunteering has held steady, the amount of time volunteers spend in service has declined as volunteering becomes more episodic. In 2003 and 2009, 51 percent of survey respondents reported volunteering in the prior year. While volunteers in the 2003 study reported spending an average of 15 hours a month in volunteer service, in 2009, volunteers report spending an average of six to 10 hours per month in service—a decline of five to nine hours per month over the six-year time period.

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richard havlik & donna kaminski, the body pro: HIV/AIDS & aging overview (0120)

Aging Before Your Time?
By Richard J. Havlik, M.D., M.P.H. and Donna M. Kaminski
Fall 2009

chers—

this is a dramatic cultural redefinition of “AIDS.” there will also be unintended effects from this new characterization, and other embedded stigmas. thanks for the heads-up to jules levin & nelson vergel

namaste

—rk

Introduction

We are all aging, whether we are HIV positive or negative. It is part of the natural course of life. A small number of individuals live to 100 years of age with minimal disease and disability. Others seem to have accelerated aging with deterioration of multiple body systems, disability, and chronic diseases. Naturally, this brings us to wonder what factors account for this difference in aging.

To date, we’ve been able to identify a couple of factors. Resveratrol, a compound found to help fruit flies and yeast live longer, has been studied for its role in slowing down the aging process. Other studies have also looked at a gene called FOXO3A. People who have mutations in this gene seem to have a slower aging process. Studies are under way to see if these factors could be modified to help slow down the aging process, and to see what else seems to affect aging.

An Aging Epidemic

Fortunately for people with HIV, treatment has improved and people are living longer. It’s estimated that by the year 2015, almost half of people with HIV will be over 50. In New York City, over 36% are over 50. By 2005, the number of people with AIDS in the U.S. who were over 50 was seven times higher than it was in 1990. Some of this may be due to greater testing efforts, but some of it is also due to improved access to HIV treatment.

But older adults are still getting diagnosed later in their disease than younger people. An Italian study looked at 1,977 people who received care from 1986 to 1998. About a third had a late diagnosis of AIDS, and the most significant factor linked with that late diagnosis was age. People who were over 45 were more likely to be diagnosed at a later stage of HIV disease.

One study found that only 59% of HIV-positive adults over 65 survived more than three years, compared with 90% of adults aged 20 to 39.

Another study found that more than half of newly diagnosed older adults developed AIDS in less than a year. A third study found that only 59% of HIV-positive adults over 65 survived more than three years, compared with 90% of adults aged 20 to 39. Despite earlier testing efforts and greater access to medications, people are getting diagnosed at later ages and are at risk of shorter survival times.

In order to support people over 50, we need to have a better understanding of aging and HIV. This article will review what is known about the aging process and what is seen in people with HIV. Finally, it will review what needs to be better defined, and what might slow aging regardless of HIV status.

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video post: kearns to LA city council announcing elder HIV/AIDS summit & new media training feb 12 (0119)

chers—

if this works, share my joy of this unhistoric moment of major insignificance, la la la

namaste

—rk

after the jump

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nielsenwire: social networkers are mostly urban & affluent (0117)

The More Affluent and More Urban are More Likely to use Social Networks
September 25, 2009

If you’re in the U.S. and are using a social network like Facebook, MySpace or LinkedIn, chances are you’re more affluent and more urban than the average American according to Nielsen Claritas, which provides in-depth segmentation analysis of consumer behavior.

“Nielsen’s online data shows that about half of the U.S. population visited a social networking website in the last year and that number grows every quarter,” said Wils Corrigan, AVP, Research & Development, Nielsen Claritas. “The rising popularity of these sites and the deep engagement consumers have with them has advertisers and marketers asking for more and more detail as to which lifestyles should be targeted for their online advertising and promotions.”

Facebook vs Myspace

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nielsenwire: 17.5million seniors online in 2009, 10% of all internet users, 55% growth in segment (0116)

Six Million More Seniors Using the Web than Five Years Ago
December 10, 2009

While people 65 and older still make up less than 10 percent of the active Internet universe, their numbers are on the rise. In the last five years, the number of seniors actively using the Internet has increased by more than 55 percent, from 11.3 million active users in November 2004 to 17.5 million in November 2009. Among people 65+, the growth of women in the last five years has outpaced the growth of men by 6 percentage points.

Not only are more people 65 and older heading online, but they are also spending more time on the Web. Time spent on the Internet by seniors increased 11 percent in the last five years, from approximately 52 hours per month in November 2004 to just over 58 hours in 2009.

“The over 65 crowd represents about 13% of the total population and with this increase in online usage, they are beginning to catch up with their offline numbers,” notes Chuck Schilling, research director, agency & media, Nielsen’s online division. “Looking at what they’re doing online, it makes sense they’re engaged in many of the same activities that dominate other age segments – e-mail, sharing photos, social networking, checking out the latest news and weather – and it’s worth noting that a good percentage of them are spending time with age-appropriate pursuits such as leisure travel, personal health care and financial concerns.”

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