kathleen blanchard, EmaxHealth: elder HIVers experience premature brain aging (0126)

HIV infection or treatments causing premature brain aging
by Kathleen Blanchard RN
Jan 23rd, 2010
The Journal of Infectious Diseases 2010;201:336–340

Individuals with HIV are  found to suffer from premature aging of the brain, either from the infection or from the treatments. Scientists say the findings of concerning, given the present statistics that 14 to 18 percent of HIV infections in the US are among the over 50 age group. Cognitive decline and memory loss are being reported by individuals with HIV. Researchers say brain aging associated with HIV is a public health concern that needs more study.

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hivandhepatitisdotcom, cme & newsletter: non-AIDS-defining illnesses in the mature patient (part iii of iii in “the graying of an empidemic: clinical considerations of HIV and aging”) (0125)

chers—

this is a link to the pdf for part iii on an excellent series called “the graying of an epidemic: clinical considerations of HIV and Aging,” available as a cme from hivandhepatitis.com. the other two parts are below.

namaste

—rk

hivandhepatitisdotcom, cme & newsleetter: HIV and cardiovascular disease in the mature patient (part ii of iii in “the graying of an epidemic: clinical considerations of HIV and aging”) (0124)

chers—

this is a link to the pdf for part ii on an excellent series called “the graying of an epidemic: clinical considerations of HIV and Aging,” available as a cme from hivandhepatitis.com. the other two parts are above & belowe.

namaste

—rk

http://www.hivandhepatitis.com/cme/2010/healthmatters/cardio/images/Cardiovascular.pdf

hivandhepatitisdotcom: cme & newsletter: managing HIV infection in the mature patient (part i of iii in the graying of an epidemic) (0123)

chers—

this is a link to the pdf for part i on an excellent sereis called “the graying of an epidemic: clinical considerations of HIV and Aging,” available as a cme from hivandhepatitis.com. the other two parts follow above.

namaste—rk

http://www.hivandhepatitis.com/cme/2010/healthmatters/aging/images/Graying.pdf

nielsenwire: “global” use averages 5.5 hours daily on web social media in 2009, up 82% in 12 months (0122)

Led by Facebook, Twitter, Global Time Spent on Social Media Sites up 82% Year over Year
January 22, 2010

According to The Nielsen Company, global* consumers spent more than five and half hours on social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter in December 2009, an 82% increase from the same time last year when users were spending just over three hours on social networking sites. In addition, the overall traffic to social networking sites has grown over the last three years.

chers—

below is the [*]footnote from all the way at the end. also, compare this with the nielson article on the growth of the senior segment of the internet market.

“*Global data takes into account the following countries: U.S., U.K., Australia, Brazil, Japan, Switzerland, Germany, France, Spain and Italy”

read on & namaste

—rk

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peter salgo, second opinion stat! (PBS): HIV/AIDS in middle age at the aging suite (0121)

HIV and AIDS in Older Adults… Part I
Peter Salgo, MD (PBS’s second opinion stat!)
the Aging Suite
December 7, 2009

While sexually transmitted diseases were once thought of as a problem in the young population, diseases such as HIV are rising at alarming rates in the middle age and elderly. Social, medical, physical and cultural factors are contributing to this trend.

This APT medical series explores illnesses one at a time and features a panel of physicians and other experts assessing individual cases. Visit http://www.SecondOpinion-TV.org

video after the jump

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richard havlik & donna kaminski, the body pro: HIV/AIDS & aging overview (0120)

Aging Before Your Time?
By Richard J. Havlik, M.D., M.P.H. and Donna M. Kaminski
Fall 2009

chers—

this is a dramatic cultural redefinition of “AIDS.” there will also be unintended effects from this new characterization, and other embedded stigmas. thanks for the heads-up to jules levin & nelson vergel

namaste

—rk

Introduction

We are all aging, whether we are HIV positive or negative. It is part of the natural course of life. A small number of individuals live to 100 years of age with minimal disease and disability. Others seem to have accelerated aging with deterioration of multiple body systems, disability, and chronic diseases. Naturally, this brings us to wonder what factors account for this difference in aging.

To date, we’ve been able to identify a couple of factors. Resveratrol, a compound found to help fruit flies and yeast live longer, has been studied for its role in slowing down the aging process. Other studies have also looked at a gene called FOXO3A. People who have mutations in this gene seem to have a slower aging process. Studies are under way to see if these factors could be modified to help slow down the aging process, and to see what else seems to affect aging.

An Aging Epidemic

Fortunately for people with HIV, treatment has improved and people are living longer. It’s estimated that by the year 2015, almost half of people with HIV will be over 50. In New York City, over 36% are over 50. By 2005, the number of people with AIDS in the U.S. who were over 50 was seven times higher than it was in 1990. Some of this may be due to greater testing efforts, but some of it is also due to improved access to HIV treatment.

But older adults are still getting diagnosed later in their disease than younger people. An Italian study looked at 1,977 people who received care from 1986 to 1998. About a third had a late diagnosis of AIDS, and the most significant factor linked with that late diagnosis was age. People who were over 45 were more likely to be diagnosed at a later stage of HIV disease.

One study found that only 59% of HIV-positive adults over 65 survived more than three years, compared with 90% of adults aged 20 to 39.

Another study found that more than half of newly diagnosed older adults developed AIDS in less than a year. A third study found that only 59% of HIV-positive adults over 65 survived more than three years, compared with 90% of adults aged 20 to 39. Despite earlier testing efforts and greater access to medications, people are getting diagnosed at later ages and are at risk of shorter survival times.

In order to support people over 50, we need to have a better understanding of aging and HIV. This article will review what is known about the aging process and what is seen in people with HIV. Finally, it will review what needs to be better defined, and what might slow aging regardless of HIV status.

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